Academia

Lauren Celano

Lauren
Celano

Building skills for career success while in academia

The topic of career planning is something that I discuss with almost everyone I speak with, regardless of whether they are a graduate student or industry professional.  I emphasize that regardless of where someone is in their career, steps can be taken to develop the hard (e.g. techniques) and ...


Donna Kridelbaugh

Donna
Kridelbaugh

#SCICOMM TIP: NEVER CLAIM TO BE THE FIRST TO DO ANYTHING IN SCIENCE

You see it all the time—in a popular news article about a groundbreaking research study to even the primary literature—that so-and-so researcher is the “first” to make some brand new discovery.This claim makes me cringe every time I see it. Why? Well to be honest, it’s highly unlikely to b...


sandlin.preecs@gmail.com

Sandlin
Seguin

Basics of Curriculum Development

Chances are good that at some point in your career, you will need to teach people something in a formal environment like a classroom or lecture hall. You might get assigned the entire first year of intro bio (with labs), or you might just give a guest lecture in some graduate seminar where you ...


DaveGalgoczy@biocareers.com

Dave
Galgoczy

Beyond the academic herd: how to pursue opportunity

Years ago, during my grad school interviews, the late Seymour Benzer told me that I would be forced to decide in grad school whether I would “run with the herd,” or instead become one of the few scientists who would be comfortable operating more independently. That succinct statement encomp...


thomas.magaldi@biocareers.com

Thomas
Magaldi

No Grandma, I am not that type of doctor: Never be ashamed of your PhD

Two weeks after I finished graduate school, my father-in-law introduced me to a friend by saying “I want you to meet my son-in-law. He just became a doctor.” While I forced a grin and politely accepted the ensuing congratulations, I instead wanted to clarify that I just received a PhD, and th...


ceweinber@yahoo.com

Clement
Weinberger

Fifty ways to leave your lover

This doesn’t sound much like the title of a career path blog, does it? You most likely know it as the title of a song by Paul Simon, but while it may resonate with a lot of people, what specific relevance could it have to science PhDs and postdocs? Well, it does make sense if your first ...


jane.yang@biocareers.com

Jane
Yang

Ready for a major career change? You’re not alone – part one

I am new to Bio Careers Blog.  Excited as I am as a first-timer, I will set a rule for my blog: I do not intend to give out specific action items or tips to fellow job seekers. You see, I am one of you.  After many years of academic research, I am ready for a major career change.  It seems lik...


SUZANE.RAMOS@GMAIL.COM

Suzane
Ramos da Silva

The importance of lab meetings

Since I was an undergrad, lab meetings have been part of my scientific development. Although some people don’t like lab meetings, I think it is a great opportunity to brainstorm, keep up with your experiments and most importantly, it is a great way to organize your data. Different labs h...


ceweinber@yahoo.com

Clement
Weinberger

The future may be more in the benefits (Discussion) than the features (Methods/Results)

PhD students, and a majority of PhDs in science, spend many hours at the bench doing research designed to obtain results that will either confirm or reject a hypothesis. They write, defend and revise a thesis. Along the way, and as soon and as often as possible afterward, they publish the resul...


ceweinber@yahoo.com

Clement
Weinberger

Making a journal short list

At some point, you will have to choose journals to submit your articles to. Finding the right journal is important because if your article isn’t published in a timely fashion, say within a year of a congress presentation, no one will know about it, and a delay will make someone ask, “why di...